Site

In 2016-19, Center researchers will be conducting an evaluation of a new LA County Department of Mental Health program, Assisted Outpatient Treatment, which is designed to reach out to and engage vulnerable individuals who are in need of but not receiving mental health services.

Our proposal to the County

What we have learned about AOT programs across the country

Lead Research Team:

Joel Braslow
Joel Braslow

Ron Calderon
Ron Calderon

Erin Kelly
Erin Kelly

Marcia Meldrum
Marcia Meldrum

Sarah Starks
Sarah Starks


Project Data

Care for Severe Mental Illness
in Los Angeles County (1850s to present)
 
Oral Histories
 
 

In the past 50 years, through the initiative and efforts of DMH clinicians and staff, social workers, advocates, family members, and people with mental illness themselves, Los Angeles County has learned how to help those lost in darkness to find their way back to secure and rewarding lives. But what has been done is not yet enough. Here are the stories of what is possible, what has been achieved, and how and why the vision still remains unfulfilled.

Suspendisse mauris. Fusce accumsan mollis eros. Pellentesque a diam sit amet mi ullamcorper vehic ula. Integer adipiscing risus a sem. Nullam quis massa sit amet nibh viverra malesuada. Nunc sem lac us, accumsan quis, faucibus non, congue vel, arcu. Ut scelerisque hendrerit tellus. Integer sagittis. Viva mus a mauris eget arcu gravida tristique. Nunc iaculis mi in ante. Vivamus imperdiet nibh feugiat est. Ut convallis, sem sit amet interdum consectetuer, odio augue aliquam leo, nec dapibus tortor nibh sed augue. Integer eu magna sit amet metus fermentum posuere. Morbi sit amet nulla sed dolor elemen tum imperdiet. Quisque fermentum. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Pellentesque adipiscing eros ut libero. Ut condimentum mi vel tellus. Suspendisse laoreet. Fusce ut est sed dolor gravida convallis. Morbi vitae ante.Vivamus ultrices luctus nunc. Suspendisse et dolor. Etiam dignissim.

Share:

Dr. Leo Rangell (1913-2011) was a leading American psychoanalyst, writer, teacher, and charismatic leader in his field. He championed the insights of Freudian and humanistic psychiatry in an era increasingly dominated by antipsychotic drugs. Rangell authored 450 papers and nine books, taught at UCLA and UCSF for 50 years, and continued to see patients until the last days of his life. In his final book,inThe Road to Unity in Psychoanalytic Theory, Dr. Rangell undertook the heroic task of creating a unified Freudian synthesis of the multiple psychoanalytic schools -- Adlerian, Sullivanian, Kleinian, Kohutian, Reichian -- a project which many of his colleagues considered impossible, but which he saw as crucial to re-establishing the influence and credibility of his field.

The Leo Rangell Professorial Endowment is made possible by a generous gift from Stewart and Lynda Resnick to the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior.


Dr. Leo Rangell (1913-2011) was a leading American psychoanalyst, writer, teacher, and statesman in his field, championing the insights of Freudian and humanistic psychiatry in an era increasingly dominated by antipsychotic drugs.  He authored 450 papers and nine books, taught at the University of California for 50 years, and continued to see patients until the last days of his life.

Leo Rangell was born in Brooklyn, New York, October 1, 1913, the child of recent immigrants from Eastern Europe.  He graduated from Boys High School and became a premed student at Columbia, where he earned his BS with honors in 1933.  After completing medical school at the University of Chicago in 1937, he returned to New York for internship and residency.  He became interested in psychoanalysis, his lifelong passion, during a neurology residency at Montefiore Hospital.  As a psychiatry resident at Columbia Physicians and Surgeons, he worked with Dr. Margaret Mahler on the first paper to examine Tourette's syndrome from an analytic, psychosomatic perspective and became deeply interested in the work of Austrian psychoanalyst Otto Fenichel.  In 1939, he married Anita Buchwald, his lifelong companion and the mother of his four children.

Rangell worked briefly at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute before joining the US Air Force, where he provided psychiatric care for pilots who had been shot down and injured, and for former prisoners of war.  After the war ended, he moved to California, where he served as clinical professor of psychiatry at both UCLA and UCSF, in addition to a busy private practice.  His colleagues recognized his charismatic leadership, exemplified by his presidencies of the Los Angeles Psychoanalytic Association, American Psychoanalytic Association, and International Psychoanalytic Association.  His writing encompassed a wide range of topics, from the problem of conversion to child development to the impact of presidential misconduct on the American psyche to the meaning of free will in the context of the Freudian unconscious.  While recovering from heart bypass surgery in 1995, he began experiencing auditory muscial hallucinations; although these phenomena initially caused him concern, he soon embraced them as rich additions to his inner life and wrote about them in Music in the Head.

In his final book, The Road to Unity in Psychoanalytic Theory, Dr. Rangell undertook the heroic task of creating a unified Freudian synthesis of the multiple different psychoanalytic schools — Adlerian, Sullivanian, Kleinian, Kohutian, Reichian - a project which many considered impossible, but which he saw as critically important to reestablishing the credibility of the field .

Leo Rangell died May 28, 2011, in Los Angeles, of complications following a surgical procedure.  He was 97 years old.

Share:

Project Data

Date Client Architect Build Cost Status
June 2012 Company Inc. Contour $10m USD Complete

The Center for the Study of the History of Neuropsychopharmacology is a unique interdisciplinary project at UCLA. We carry out original research in the history of neuropsychopharmacology, neuroscience, and mental health services, and collect archival documents, oral histories, audio and video recordings, and other materials that document this history. We collaborate with other scholars at UCLA and USC, with the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology, and with the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health.

The Center for the Study of the History of Neuropsychopharmacology documents and promotes interest in the history of the field of Neuropsychopharmacology, the research field that studies brain and neural mechanisms, states of consciousness and mental illness, and the pharmacodynamics of psychoactive drugs. Our purpose is to inform the contemporary  cientific and cultural understanding of this dynamic international field.

CSHN is a collaborative project of the American College of  Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP), and the Health Services Research Center at UCLA, part of the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior.

Explore our website, where you can read about the lives and work of scientists who study the brain, mental illness, and psychoactive drugs, told in their own words; discover papers and documents describing their research and the history of the ACNP; and learn much more about this fascinating field and the people who work in it.

Share:

Project Data

Date Client Architect Build Cost Status
June 2012 Company Inc. Contour $10m USD Complete

We are at a unique moment in history. In the past 50 years, technological, intellectual, social, and cultural developments have transformed human genetics into one of the most respected fields in biomedical science and clinical medicine, one that has revolutionized the ways in which we understand health and disease. At this moment, we have the opportunity to capture the memories and insights of those people who created and advanced this revolution.

With the creation of the OHHG Archive, we are designing a resource that will allow researchers now and in the future to gain new insights into the history of human genetics as it developed in the second half of the 20th century.  The core of the archive are oral histories with clinicians, scientists, theorists, ethicists, and legal experts that have been transcribed, annotated, and supplemented in an online searchable database accessible to researchers interested in the development of the field of human genetics.

This resource will enable researchers at all levels of expertise and from multiple fields to readily locate the information of interest to them and point them toward new questions, new hypotheses, and new meanings of the materials.

This project is a collaboration between historians of science at UCLA and Johns Hopkins University.

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0551068 and the National Human Genome Research Initiative under Grant No. 003206. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Human Genome Research Initiative or of the National Science Foundation.

 

Share:
Subscribe to RSS - Site